Pastor Wrinkles: House On Fire Pt. 34

The Word of God is a bridge that connects Earth with Heaven and Heaven with Earth.- Joseph Elon Lillie

The Word of God is a bridge that connects Earth with Heaven and Heaven with Earth.- Joseph Elon Lillie

 

Debby Robin and I have been having a great spiritual conversation regarding God’s will in conflict. If you missed the beginning of that discussion you can find it here

http://wp.me/p39vIx-Sj

We continue our discussion of the Book of Acts as we turn now to Acts 16:1-5

Paul adds Timothy to the team:

Paul went first to Derbe and then to Lystra, where there was a young disciple named Timothy. His mother was a Jewish believer, but his father was a Greek. 2 Timothy was well thought of by the believers in Lystra and Iconium,3 so Paul wanted him to join them on their journey. In deference to the Jews of the area, he arranged for Timothy to be circumcised before they left, for everyone knew that his father was a Greek. 4 Then they went from town to town, instructing the believers to follow the decisions made by the apostles and elders in Jerusalem. 5 So the churches were strengthened in their faith and grew larger every day.

By most accounts Timothy was a teen-ager at the time Paul brought him onto the team.

From these verses what inferences can be made about why Paul would choose to bring such a young man on to his team? Do you think bringing Timothy on board had anything to do with his recent refusal to allow John Mark back on the team? What role do you imagine Timothy played?

 

 

4 thoughts on “Pastor Wrinkles: House On Fire Pt. 34

  1. I believe bringing Timothy along was directly related to Paul’s refusal of John Mark. So many times we react with our emotions in haste when we should have responded in love. Bringing Timothy on board was not only in response to his refusal of John Mark but maybe one of an outreach to the younger generation. What better than a young man who has lived with both a Jew and a Gentile and knows both ways of life. His testimony would reach to all believers both Jew and Gentile.

    • This is a good thought Deb. I wonder if there wasn’t a specific role John Mark was supposed to play like youth pastor or something that still needed to be filled but Paul felt was not to be filled by John Mark. If so he still needed someone and as you say a young man with both Jewish and Gentile background who had already proved himself faithful fit the bill perfectly. Circumcision was probably a good indication of Timothy’s level of commitment.

  2. According to these verses, Timothy’s mother was a Jewish believer (a person familiar with Jewish law and Christianity). Timothy was well thought of – he was respected – in Lystra and Iconium. That is the reason these verses state that Paul wanted Timothy to join him.

    There is nothing in these verses to indicate that Timothy was brought onto the team by anything than his own merit.

    I believe Paul mentored Timothy until he was able to establish his own ministry. Forgive me for not having the reference handy, but it is time to walk my dogs and I don’t have time to look it up. I remember that Paul defended Timothy’s youth because of his faith and knowledge. (?).

    • I agree with you Robin. Timothy had something that made Paul say “Yes I want him on my team.” The Scripture directly states he was well thought of in the church. To be so respected at such a young age meant Timothy was a truly gited individual. He was truly dedicated to the cause to as evidenced by his willingness to leave his home and to be circumcised for the purpose of building team effectiveness.
      It is interesting to me that Paul chose to reach out to one so young. I think it shows his understanding of transgenerational ministry and his desire to establish not a just peer to peer relationships but mentor relationships.
      We know from his letters to Timothy and the Pauline epistles that he eventually gave Timothy the lead pastorate of the church in Ephesus but I wonder what Timothy’s role was here at the beginning. I am sure he was more than a bystander.

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